Apple launches new support page for bent iPad Pro models

Image: Apple

Good news for those who own a bent iPad Pro: Apple has launched an all-new support page dedicated for the enclosure of the iPad Pro. The page, titled “iPad Pro unibody enclosure design,” offers more information on the design of the enclosure, and allows customers who have an issue with their device to contact Apple Support.

Late Friday, Apple officially launched a support page titled “iPad Pro unibody enclosure design” that details how the enclosure of the new iPad Pro is made, and what to do if you believe your iPad Pro is defective.

Back in December, 9to5Mac published an email they received from Apple’s Senior Vice President of Hardware Engineering, Dan Riccio. According to his Apple executive page, “Dan leads the Mac, iPhone, iPad and iPod engineering teams which have delivered dozens of breakthrough products.” Here is the official email that was sent to 9to5Mac:

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Image: 9to5Mac

In the support page, Apple says the iPad Pro third-generation is “strong, light, and durable.” Furthermore, the page particularly focuses on iPad Pro with Cellular, as many reports of bending have come from models equipped with cellular where the antenna line is at the top of the device. Apple outlined the process here:

iPad Pro cellular models now feature Gigabit-class LTE, with support for more cellular bands than any other tablet. To provide optimal cellular performance, small vertical bands or “splits” in the sides of the iPad allow parts of the enclosure to function as cellular antennas. For the first time ever on an iPad, these bands are manufactured using a process called co-molding. In this high-temperature process, plastic is injected into precisely milled channels in the aluminum enclosure where it bonds to micro-pores in the aluminum surface. After the plastic cools, the entire enclosure is finished with a precision CNC machining operation, yielding a seamless integration of plastic and aluminum into a single, strong enclosure.

These precision manufacturing techniques and a rigorous inspection process ensure that these new iPad Pro models meet an even tighter specification for flatness than previous generations. This flatness specification allows for no more than 400 microns of deviation across the length of any side — less than the thickness of four sheets of paper. The new straight edges and the presence of the antenna splits may make subtle deviations in flatness more visible only from certain viewing angles that are imperceptible during normal use. These small variances do not affect the strength of the enclosure or the function of the product and will not change over time through normal use.

ipad-pro
Image: Apple

Apple says that any “subtle deviations in flatness” beyond the 400-micron specifications shouldn’t be a concern since you don’t typically use iPad Pro from the top-down. Furthermore, last month, Apple told The Verge: “any slight bends are a result of the iPad Pro’s manufacturing and cooling process.” Apple even goes as far as saying that this is “completely normal.”

If you own an iPad Pro and believe it is defective, Apple says you can contact Apple Support and open a case. According to the page, “Apple offers a 14-day return policy for products purchased directly from Apple. Apple also provides up to a one-year warranty on our products and will cover damage if it has occurred due to a defect in materials or workmanship.”

If you own an iPad Pro that is defective and contact Apple Support, I would love to hear about your experience. Please comment below, or join our Telegram group.

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Sid Ramirez

I usually write stuff, mostly Apple. Photographer, film major, environmentalist, techie.

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