iPad Pro Geekbench scores are out, rivals MacBook Pro scores

Image: Apple

When Apple unveiled the all-new, redesigned iPad Pro, they boasted about how powerful A12X Bionic Chip was, and we all knew the iPad Pro would be a monster. But, just how much of a beast did we think it was? The Geekbench scores are out, and here’s what you need to know.

iPadPro2018
Image: Apple

The redesigned iPad Pro is the most powerful iPad ever, possibly the most powerful tablet ever. During Tuesday’s “There’s more in the making” event in Brooklyn, New York, Apple boasted that the new iPad Pro is 92% faster than most laptop PCs on the market today.

The Apple A12 Bionic chip inside the iPhone Xs, Xs Max, and Xr was already a beast. Hell, even the A10 Fusion chip inside my 6th-generation iPad is more than enough for what I throw at it.

But, the A12X Bionic chip inside the iPad Pro is a beast of a processor. Apple says, “A12X Bionic is the smartest, most powerful chip we’ve ever made. It has the Neural Engine, which runs five trillion operations per second and enabled advanced machine learning.” On the iPad Pro website, Apple touts “It’s faster than most PC laptops.

All that information sounds great, but, it really matters when it comes down to scores. Well, that’s actually a common misconception. The performance only really matters when it exceeds your expectations, increases the speed of your workflow, and makes work easier. Nevertheless, let us talk numbers.

Screenshot-2018-11-01-at-10.15.30
Image: 9to5Mac

Geekbench scores for the new iPad Pro are out, and they are quite impressive. iPad Pro has a Single-Core score of about 5020, and a Multi-core Score of 18217. For reference, a MacBook Pro (15-inch Mid 2018) with an Intel Core i9-8950HK processor has a Single-core score of 5344 and a Multi-core score of 22552. This makes iPad Pro toe-to-toe with a Core i9 MacBook Pro, that’s insanity.

mbpi9geekbench
MacBook Pro (15-inch Mid 2018) with an Intel Core i9-8950HK. Source: Geekbench.

Keep in mind, the only Apple product that rivals iPad Pro in Single-core Score is the Core i9 MacBook Pro. The iPad Pro starts at $799, while the Core i9 MacBook Pro is over $3,099.

The new iPad Pro is 30% faster than the previous model. Additionally, the new iPad Pro is faster than all 2017 Macs, even toe-to-toe with the iMac Pro single-core score.

According to 9to5Mac, “The second-gen iPad Pro could achieve just under 30,000 on the Metal compute benchmark. The new Pro models easily top 41,000.

Image: Apple

Digging deeper in the Geekbench score gives us two model identifiers: ‘iPad8,8‘ and ‘iPad8,3‘. iPad8,8 refers to a 1 TB iPad Pro, while iPad 8,3 is all the other configurations under 1 TB. The Geekbench scores state that the 1 TB (8,8) iPad Pro has 6 GB of RAM, and the (8,3) iPad Pro has 4 GB of RAM.

iOS is notorious for not needing as much RAM as Android devices to run smoothly, thus not requiring Apple to boast about RAM in their devices. But, with the new iPad Pro, and forthcoming iOS 13 and onward, we may see new features that will take advantage of more RAM.

iPad Pro is available now, with the 11-inch model at $799, and the 12.9-inch model at $999. You can configure the 11-inch model up to 1 TB, with pricing at $949 for 256GB, $1149 for 512GB and $1549 for 1 TB. The 12.9-inch model at $999 for 64GB, $1149 for 256GB, $1349 for 512GB, and a cool $1749 for 1 TB.

The second-generation Apple Pencil costs $129, and the Smart Keyboard Folio for the 12.9-inch iPad Pro is $199, and the 11-inch Folio is $179.

iPad Pro, and all the available accessories, ships on November 7th, 2018.

Published by

Sid Ramirez

I usually write stuff, mostly Apple. Photographer, film major, environmentalist, techie.

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